Line of Surprise

It’s been quite some time since I did a blog post but I need to get back to it…  Here’s the reason why… I’ve have a great honor bestowed on me and that’s watching my youngest grandson while I’m not traveling or teaching photography.  It is an absolute joy watching him learn and to just spend time with him as he grows. It does my heart good!!!  He’s walking now and keeps an old guy like me jumping (lol)  Ok, enough personal stuff for now so let’s share a few installments of photography wisdom!

“Line of Surprise”

“Learning to capture light will make extraordinary images from ordinary subjects”, I coined this saying when I first started my photography career. I’m a full time professional master landscape photographer and I’ve been teaching photography workshops going on two decades. It’s been an amazing journey and I’m thankful for my many sponsors and clients over the years.

So, let’s jump into the heart of this article and hopefully you can take something from it to carry forward in your photographic journey. Remember it’s never too late to strengthen your photographic foundation.

When it comes to compositional elements there are more lines than any other element in the photographic world. Lines in photographs provide a path that lead the viewer’s eye.

There are many ways to show a sense of movement in a photograph, such as the arrangement of objects, the position of shapes or the flow of a river from one element to another and, hopefully, keep the viewer in the photograph. There can be several types of lines in a photograph and I’ll touch on a few over the next few posts:

Composition” is the term used for the arrangements of the elements in or the subject matter of a photograph. A successful composition draws the viewer in and pulls their eye across the whole photograph so that everything is absorbed and finally settles on the main subject of the photograph.

The “Elements of Composition” in photography are used to arrange or organize the components in a way that is pleasing to the photographer and, hopefully, the viewer. It helps to provide structure to the layout and the way the subject is presented. It also encourages or leads the viewer’s eye to roam around the whole photograph, taking in everything and ultimately coming back to rest on the main focal point.

 

Stay tuned for the next installment of “Line of Surprise”

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THE AUTUMNAL EQUINOX

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Happy First Day of Autumn,

As summer is quickly ushered out I see the ever present signs of autumn everywhere. Daylight hours shrink and temperatures drop, the trees are starting to exhibit their colorful coat of painted glory. The farmers work feverishly to gather the crops as they have done as their fathers before them. The birds and squirrels seem to be working overtime in preparation for the winter months. The sounds and smells of autumn are unmistakably crisp and welcoming. Like an old friend your well-worn sweater accompanies you on those early mornings as you start your daily rituals. Starting a new season is always bittersweet but time stops for no one and life marches on.

Metadata:

  • Nikon D810
  • Tamron Lens –SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC @70mm
  • Gitzo GT3542xls tripod
  • Lexar CF Card
  • Hoodman USA
  • OP/TECH USA Classic Strap
  • Nik Software
  • Exposure – one seconds
  • Aperture – f/16
  • ISO – 64
  • Manual Mode

Best of Light,

Ed

 

The Things People Think

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Good Saturday morning,

This morning Zach and I ran out locally for a quick sunrise shot. If you think about it there are really only a few types of people that are up this early;  photographers, bikers and runners. Well needless to say, while we were shooting several friends of mine that were out biking (I call them the Metzler crew) rode by and of course we got harassed for standing alongside of the road but it’s all in good jest and as they rode away I heard one of the guys say I bet they shot that barn 1000 times. Well maybe not 1000, but we’re certainly well into the hundreds. (lol)

Metadata:

  • Nikon D810
  • Tamron lens –24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC @50mm
  • Gitzo GT3542xls tripod
  • Lexar CF Card
  • Nik Collection by Google
  • Topaz Labs
  • Exposure – 0.8 seconds
  • Aperture – f/16
  • ISO – 64
  • Manual Mode

Best of Light,

Ed

Rainy Day Sale

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Good morning,

This image of the Amish Girls is from the rainy Gordonville Mud Sale that was held a couple of weeks ago. I wanted to capture the mood and show how the rain played a huge part in setting the feeling of this image.

Metadata:

  • Nikon D3
  • Tamron lens –28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di VC PZD
  • Handheld with VC on
  • Lexar CF Card
  • Topaz Labs
  • Exposure – 1/500
  • Aperture – f/5.3
  • ISO – 800
  • Aperture Mode

Best of Light,

Ed

Horse & Buggy

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Good morning,

I seem to be running a little behind in my image processing and sharing. I’ve been pretty busy which I hear is a good thing (lol).

I just got back from a wildly successful workshop/lecture sponsored by Tamron at Precision Camera near Austin Texas. I love the people there and they are exactly what a teacher dreams about. They were very eager to learn, very appreciative with the information shared and all around great people.

As I mentioned I’m behind on my image sharing and this one is from a few weeks ago while Zach and I were out shooting barns at sunrise.
Metadata:
• Nikon D800
• Tamron lens –24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
• Gitzo GT3542xls tripod
• Singh Ray Filters
• Lexar CF Card
• Topaz Labs
• Exposure – 1/60
• Aperture – f/8
• ISO – 800 (to freeze the horse in low light)
• Manual Mode

Best of Light,
Ed

Sunrise Barn

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Good morning and thanks for stopping by 🙂

This image is from our sunrise outing yesterday (Sunday) morning. Zach and I took a ride out through scenic Lancaster County in hopes of finding a nice red barn to contrast with the fresh snow and it didn’t take long for us to find exactly what we were looking for! One of the nice things about living in a rural area is you can normally find parking along the road where you would like to shoot. Of course this isn’t always the case but more often than not we luck out.

As you can imagine Lancaster County has a ton of barns and a majority of them are Amish. The trick is finding one that is located in a good spot (not too much clutter) and it helps if it is facing in the right direction (sunrise or sunset) depending on the time of day you’re out shooting. Okay, I guess I’ll come clean (grin). I’ve shot this barn before and knew exactly where we needed to be to capture sunrise and its resplendent color.

I’m going to try and blog more often so please stay tuned 🙂

Metadata:

  • Nikon D800
  • Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8 lens
  • Gitzo gt3542 carbon fiber tripod
  • Exposure – 1/10 second
  • Aperture – f/11
  • ISO – 100
  • Focal length – 70mm
  • Manual Mode
  • BlackRapid Yeti Strap

Best of Light,
Ed

Revisiting Areas

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Greetings,

How many of you visit the same area to photograph over and over? Well if you’re like me you do it quite often. As photographers we are always looking for the perfect light and not to mention  tweaking or fine-tuning our compositions from a previous shoot.

So go ahead and re-visit your favorite areas and hopefully you’ll get the shoot you were hoping for!

Best of Light,

Ed